Fifty Shades of Terror 2018: 50 Reviews of Black & White Horror Films

This book contains 50 reviews of horror movies shot in black and white. The reviews are sorted from the last position to the first one. The ranking of each production is established by the sum of 7 ratings: stars, gimmick, rewatchability, story, creativity, acting & quality. Each film description contains a synopsis, a list of attributed genres, emotions evoked, seven ratings and a three-paragraph review.

Tokyo Gore Police

In future Tokyo, a young woman in the privatized police force tracks down her father's killer.
Slapstick Gore

 

United States
Japan
2008
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Translated
Sadist: 
Torturer
6
The body isn't a temple
8
4
6
7.04
2
3
3
Effects
Pace
Plot
You may not realize just how gratuitous gore can get until you’ve seen Tokyo Gore Police. There’s blood gushing every other scene. Ten minutes in, you know you’ve stumbled upon something special. It is written, filmed, and edited like an anime, with a hectic camera, extreme lighting, and saturated colors. The pacing intensifies and never really slows down.
The film is a mix of ancient and modern Japanese culture. Cyborgs, cyberpunks, samurais, mutants; costume designers left nothing to chance. The make-up and prosthetic never cease to amaze. I’ve never seen blood so fluid, but that comes with the territory, I guess. Director Yoshihiro Nishimura has a singular way to depict violence and to make fight scenes enthralling.
The writers are cynical, ironic, and sarcastic. The commentary exists but isn’t dense, so you’re really in for a sensational no-brainer. There are massive Dutch angles, zooms, and stuff they tell you to avoid in film school. Shows what they know! Tokyo Gore Police is not for everyone, but at least it’s unique and it doesn’t rehash clichés. It’s grotesque, disgusting, and kind of stupid.
Alternate Titles: 
Tokyo Cruel Police
The Almanac of Terror 2019: 89 Years of Horror Movie Statistics

The following recommendation lists are based on 2000 horror movie reviews. They were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is an online “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the adaptation and transformation of tangible concepts into empirical games. Not unlike sport publications, fantasy leagues and role-playing games, the Almanac of Terror mixes and aggregates different statistics, facts, ratings and opinions. Most of the lists included in this book are sorted from best to worst according to their overall score. Some lists are sorted by pertinence. Our classification method uses genres, subgenres, ambiances and antagonists. Our different ratings are as follows: stars, story, creativity, action, quality, gimmick, and rewatchability. We sometimes use the “creepiness” factor when populating certain lists.

66 All-Japanese Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by Japan. How many have you seen?

Trends of Terror 2019: 101 Horror Movies for Beginners

Have you been recently introduced to horror movies? You want to explore the genre and don’t know where to start? Here are 101 simple and accessible ranked horror movies you should definitely check out. How many have you seen?

66 All-British Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United Kingdom. How many have you seen?

66 All-American Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United States. How many have you seen?