Terror in Black and White

This book contains 101 ranked reviews of horror and horror-adjacent black and white movies. The ranking is established by the sum of 8 ratings: stars, gimmick, rewatchability, creepiness, story, creativity, acting & quality. Each article contains a rating, a synopsis, and a short review.

30 Days of Night

An Alaskan town plunged into darkness for a month is attacked by vampires.

 

United States
New Zealand
2007
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Catastrophes: 
Crash
Storm
5.04
Dark and cold
6
4
7.04
7.04
1
3
3
Performances
Plot
Ambiance
We don’t get many horror movies taking place in Alaska, or anywhere cold and icy, really, so this element alone is refreshing but badly exploited. We need the illusion of cold more than cold itself. The gimmick of this film, as suggested by the title, is that the protagonists are stuck in the dark and in the snow for 30 days. The bad news is that a clan of feral vampires are after them.
This breed of vampires is comparable to running zombies. They attack in large groups, so they get very little individual exposition. Josh Hartnett is the only big name, here. Melissa George basically gives him his cues. We never get to know them or care for them. The whole winter setup appears to be so hard on the cast that it breaks the fourth wall. Nobody on set loved this film.
If you think the protagonists are generic, wait until you meet the vampires. Bloodsucker aficionados might enjoy what the writers are trying to achieve, but between the comic book series this is based on and the final product, something gets lost. When it comes to its bad guys, 30 Days of Night picks quantity over quality. When it comes to gore, though, it’s nothing but the best.
The Almanac of Terror 2019: 89 Years of Horror Movie Statistics

The following recommendation lists are based on 2000 horror movie reviews. They were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is an online “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the adaptation and transformation of tangible concepts into empirical games. Not unlike sport publications, fantasy leagues and role-playing games, the Almanac of Terror mixes and aggregates different statistics, facts, ratings and opinions. Most of the lists included in this book are sorted from best to worst according to their overall score. Some lists are sorted by pertinence. Our classification method uses genres, subgenres, ambiances and antagonists. Our different ratings are as follows: stars, story, creativity, action, quality, gimmick, and rewatchability. We sometimes use the “creepiness” factor when populating certain lists.

66 All-Japanese Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by Japan. How many have you seen?

Trends of Terror 2019: 101 Horror Movies for Beginners

Have you been recently introduced to horror movies? You want to explore the genre and don’t know where to start? Here are 101 simple and accessible ranked horror movies you should definitely check out. How many have you seen?

66 All-British Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United Kingdom. How many have you seen?

66 All-American Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United States. How many have you seen?