Masters of Terror 2018: Charles Band's Filmography

This book contains the synopses and reviews of the darkest films in Charles Band’s filmography. The listings are ranked from best to worst.

White Noise

A grieving man communicates with his dead wife using television and radio static.
United States
Canada
United Kingdom
2005
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Sadist: 
Rigger
Torturer
Cultists: 
Worshipper
Dimensional: 
Hellish
Static
Unknown
Object: 
Footage
4
Better than static...
6
4
8
7.04
2
4
3
Performances
Ambiance
Plot
This scary film is high on suspense, minimalist even during key scenes, and exploits EVP; electronic voice phenomena, both for its marketing pitch and as a well-documented myth perfect for a movie to depict, given the obvious pitfalls are avoided. As with most pictures featuring actors with legendary portfolios, an underlying tragic romantic thriller essence is used as backdrop for the intrigue.
Michael Keaton’s performance is flawless. He gets an honorable mention for the abundance of monologue he provides. His support cast is a great match and includes other familiar faces. White Noise uses the stitched tropes of popular haunted house movies and adapts them to a phenomenon that’s on every real-life self-proclaimed demon hunter’s checklist but that's rare in past horror cinema history.
The set design is sumptuous, but the architecture is so divergent, while bringing nothing to the plot, that the simplest dialogue setup leads to distraction. Perhaps White Noise’s biggest problem, when it comes to charming the horror fan, is that by wanting to please all it pleases no one. It avoids gore at all cost and has a hook that it uses to justify conservative, safe and cheap jump scares.
Streaks of Terror 2019: My Favorite Horror Movie Franchises

Nightmare on Elm Street, Friday the 13th, Halloween, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Hellraiser, Child’s Play, Scream, Saw, Alien, Predator, Evil Dead – Film critic Steve Hutchison covers some of his favorite horror movie franchises, providing a synopsis, a review, and ranking all installments.

The Almanac of Terror 2019: 89 Years of Horror Movie Statistics

The following recommendation lists are based on 2000 horror movie reviews. They were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is an online “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the adaptation and transformation of tangible concepts into empirical games. Not unlike sport publications, fantasy leagues and role-playing games, the Almanac of Terror mixes and aggregates different statistics, facts, ratings and opinions. Most of the lists included in this book are sorted from best to worst according to their overall score. Some lists are sorted by pertinence. Our classification method uses genres, subgenres, ambiances and antagonists. Our different ratings are as follows: stars, story, creativity, action, quality, gimmick, and rewatchability. We sometimes use the “creepiness” factor when populating certain lists.

66 All-Japanese Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by Japan. How many have you seen?

Trends of Terror 2019: 101 Horror Movies for Beginners

Have you been recently introduced to horror movies? You want to explore the genre and don’t know where to start? Here are 101 simple and accessible ranked horror movies you should definitely check out. How many have you seen?

66 All-British Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United Kingdom. How many have you seen?