The Best of Terror 2017: Top 300 Horror Movies

The following recommendations represent the best 24% of 1230 horror movie reviews. Movies are classified according to their genres, subgenres, moods and antagonists. They are sorted according to the sum of various ratings: stars, story, creativity, acting, quality and rewatchability.

Darkness Falls

A vengeful spirit has taken the form of the Tooth Fairy to exact vengeance on the town that lynched her.

 

United States
Australia
2003
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Dimensional: 
Spirit
Legend: 
Myth
Urban Legend
4
In a bad light...
6
4
7.04
7.04
1
3
3
Pace
Dialogue
Plot
This film presents itself with gravitas and modernity. The hook is catchy: a man spent his life running away from the Tooth Fairy by avoiding darkness. His childhood friend now believes a young boy under her professional care is undergoing the same “condition”. That’s where the fun starts and that’s where it ends. Watching this film is like executing a tedious chore, for all kinds of reasons.
The second act is interminable. The script is problematic. The movie doesn’t deserve this running time, however modest. Watching Chaney Kley’s character handle flashlights like guns; he even buys a bunch of them at a gun store, made me roll my eyes so deep I thought I went blind. The only good thing about Darkness Falls is its production value and that’s not enough.
“Grab a flashlight!”, “Stay in the light!”, “Get in the light!”, and any combination of these sentences kept being uttered by Kley, and it was driving me nuts. This film needed a script doctor so badly. The same lines and events kept repeating themselves. How had no one seen this disaster on the page? It took three people to write this. Geez, guys...
Alternate Titles: 
Tooth Fairy
The Ghost of Matilda Dixon
The Tooth Fairy: The Ghost of Matilda Dixon
The Almanac of Terror 2019: 89 Years of Horror Movie Statistics

The following recommendation lists are based on 2000 horror movie reviews. They were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is an online “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the adaptation and transformation of tangible concepts into empirical games. Not unlike sport publications, fantasy leagues and role-playing games, the Almanac of Terror mixes and aggregates different statistics, facts, ratings and opinions. Most of the lists included in this book are sorted from best to worst according to their overall score. Some lists are sorted by pertinence. Our classification method uses genres, subgenres, ambiances and antagonists. Our different ratings are as follows: stars, story, creativity, action, quality, gimmick, and rewatchability. We sometimes use the “creepiness” factor when populating certain lists.

66 All-Japanese Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by Japan. How many have you seen?

Trends of Terror 2019: 101 Horror Movies for Beginners

Have you been recently introduced to horror movies? You want to explore the genre and don’t know where to start? Here are 101 simple and accessible ranked horror movies you should definitely check out. How many have you seen?

66 All-British Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United Kingdom. How many have you seen?

66 All-American Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United States. How many have you seen?