Subgenres of Terror 2016: 30 Best Invasion Films

The following reviews were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is a “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the transformation and adaptation of tangible concepts into empirical games. This book covers franchise and public domain horror movies only. This rule ensures that each movie can be logically related and compared to another or grouped by similarity. Movies can therefore be classified, and sorted according to inherent properties.

Song at Midnight

A disfigured musician roams a Chinese opera house.

 

China
1937
Feature Film
Realism: 
Surreal
Black & White
Sadist: 
Torturer
Stalker: 
Sneaker
Trespasser
3.04
Face the music!
5.04
3.04
3.04
3.04
1
3
2
Effects
Editing
Dialogue
Song at Midnight is a 1937 black and white production often referred to as the first Chinese horror movie. It is a loose adaptation of Gaston Leroux’s Phantom of the Opera and it comes with a political commentary. It is a musical that contains moments reminiscent of silent films. It even uses written notes that remind of us title cards, but it relies on full dialogue and an ambient musical score.
The Phantom is at first represented by a shadow on a wall and later on depicted as a hooded figure with a threatening posture and an invasive speech. He is not the only bad guy, here. We learn to hate sadists, perverts and other alternative antagonists who, in the end, sadly don’t bring much to the story. This is an interesting tale told interestingly, but it is a disjointed one.
The movie’s narrative is chaotic; cacophonic when switched in musical mode. The bad editing doesn’t help. Many shots of crowded rooms result in anarchic character blocking that create confusion. Most of the dialogue is overly dramatic, unrealistic or stretches to no end, while deep tragedies go unnoticed due to bad emotional timing in one on one conversations. Expect an unpredictable classic.
Alternate Titles: 
Ye ban ge sheng
Yeban geshang
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