Subgenres of Terror 2016: 30 Best Slasher Films

The following reviews were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is a “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the transformation and adaptation of tangible concepts into empirical games. This book covers franchise and public domain horror movies only. This rule ensures that each movie can be logically related and compared to another or grouped by similarity. Movies can therefore be classified, and sorted according to inherent properties.

The Cellar

A young boy finds a monster in the basement of his home and can't get his parents to believe him.

 

United States
1989
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Kid Friendly
Animals: 
Bird
Snake
Relative: 
Father
Catastrophes: 
Crash
Fire
Dimensional: 
Spirit
Fluids: 
Ooze
Oil
3.04
Don't go there...
6
3.04
5.04
4
2
3
3
Ambiance
Editing
Plot
This movie somewhat plays out like one of these Amityville sequels that didn’t turn out so well. The plot involves a loving father who suddenly becomes very aggressive. His land is cursed. The narrator says it’s haunted by a spirit, but, somehow, that spirit has been turned into oil that white men are not exploiting. This is a complicated story and its environmental commentary is obnoxious.
There is a severe dose of aboriginal wisdom, here, that eventually leads to witchcraft, halfway down the line, and to the kind of stuff The Omen got us used to. None of these concepts follow through. This is not a film made for children but if they don’t mind the extra layers of exposition, they might get something out of it, since the main protagonist is a kid.
The worst thing about The Cellar is its sluggish narrative. Not much happens, here. Also, the father’s descent into madness is abrupt and implausible. It happens at the turn of the third act, and it hits like a ton of bricks. Patrick Kilpatrick’s character, then, turns into a violent family man. This trope probably sounds familiar. It’s quite the cliche...
The Almanac of Terror 2019: 89 Years of Horror Movie Statistics

The following recommendation lists are based on 2000 horror movie reviews. They were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is an online “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the adaptation and transformation of tangible concepts into empirical games. Not unlike sport publications, fantasy leagues and role-playing games, the Almanac of Terror mixes and aggregates different statistics, facts, ratings and opinions. Most of the lists included in this book are sorted from best to worst according to their overall score. Some lists are sorted by pertinence. Our classification method uses genres, subgenres, ambiances and antagonists. Our different ratings are as follows: stars, story, creativity, action, quality, gimmick, and rewatchability. We sometimes use the “creepiness” factor when populating certain lists.

66 All-Japanese Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by Japan. How many have you seen?

Trends of Terror 2019: 101 Horror Movies for Beginners

Have you been recently introduced to horror movies? You want to explore the genre and don’t know where to start? Here are 101 simple and accessible ranked horror movies you should definitely check out. How many have you seen?

66 All-British Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United Kingdom. How many have you seen?

66 All-American Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United States. How many have you seen?