Pet Sematary

A family moves into a town house located near a cemetery rumored to bring back the buried to life.
Horror for Beginners
Creature Feature
United States
1989
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Character Focus: 
Animal Film
Ghost Film
Revenant Film
Child Film
Animals: 
Cat
Dog
Stalker: 
Sneaker
Trespasser
Babies: 
Toddler
Relative: 
Offspring
Sibling
Trickster: 
Impostor
Lurer
Psychics: 
Illusionist
8
One you'll be seeing again and again!
7.04
7.04
7.04
7.04
4
4
4
Ambiance
Editing
Performances
Pet Sematary is a sad and terrifying family story that excels at exploiting one of the deepest and most visceral fears humans have: losing someone they love. We learn about the cursed grounds that bring the dead to life through dialogue and flashbacks during deep discussions between neighbors. The casting is ideal for a sinister supernatural thriller of this intensity.
It feels like a TV movie, but the budget is significant. You get advanced prosthetics and the photography is peculiar. In this Stephen King adaptation, it isn't the house that is haunted but a vaguely defined area whose reach goes far beyond the cemetery gates. The place is surreal and is the villain. It is as eerie as the score: a recurring sonata sang by a children’s choir.
While most horror movies make contortions in order to stand out and be called memorable, Pet Sematary gives us a simple plot that we can all relate to. It reminds us of familiar events, patterns and struggles of family life, love and friendship, and amplifies common situations of sadness with a strong supernatural element; setting the tone for some of the creepiest scenes in horror movie history!
Alternate Titles: 
Pet Cemetery
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