My Movie Reviews

Be your own film critic!

• Record the movies you see.
• Break them down and analyze them.
• Categorize them.
• Share your movie journal with friends.
• 200 pages, 6" x 9"

Blood for Dracula

A vampire travels to Italy to find a bride.

 

France
Italy
1974
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Character Focus: 
Vampire Film
Relative: 
Offspring
Sibling
Trickster: 
Impostor
4
Low blood rate...
5.04
3.04
5.04
5.04
2
2
1
Photography
Pace
Dialogue
Shot back-to-back with Andy Warhol’s Flesh for Frankenstein, Blood for Dracula is a consensual non-consensual softcore pornographic movie vaguely based on Bram’s Stoker’s classic tale featuring full frontal nudity; male and female. Contrary to most renditions of Count Dracula, this one isn’t visited but instead leaves his castle to travel. He goes on a quest to find the ideal bride: a virgin.
Udo Kier’s vampire is depicted as picky, whiny and frail. He seems to have nothing but weaknesses and isn’t much of a threat. For these reasons, Blood for Dracula feels more like a joke than a horror movie. The humor is so subtle, yet twisted, that you might miss it if you didn’t tip your head just right. The movie is so dense with hypnotic dialogue that getting in tune with the farce is a puzzle.
All of this happens inside gorgeous Victorian interior sets; a tapestry of sculptures, beautiful paintings and high ceilings. Exterior shots are vast, breath-taking and just as vibrant. These romantic qualities alone makes the film worth watching despite the bad taste, the exploitation facet, the stagnant conversations, the lack of magic, of a worthy foe, and despite Dracula’s baffling feebleness.
Alternate Titles: 
Andy Warhol's Dracula
Dracula
Young Dracula
My Movie Reviews

Be your own film critic!

• Record the movies you see.
• Break them down and analyze them.
• Categorize them.
• Share your movie journal with friends.
• 200 pages, 6" x 9"

My Nightmare Diary

• Write about your nightmares in this dream diary. Write about places, people, and what scared you. Draw pictures of your nightmares.
• A great notebook to keep at your bedside to record your dreams and analyze them.
• 120 pages, 6" x 9"

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Godzilla Reviewed: 2020 Edition

Horror critic Steve Hutchison analyzes the 36 first Godzilla movies. How many have you seen? Each article includes a synopsis, five different ratings, and a review.