Masters of Terror 2019: Lloyd Kaufman's Filmography

This book contains the synopses and reviews of the darkest films in Lloyd Kaufman’s filmography. The listings are ranked from best to worst.

The Exorcist

Different scientists and clerics attempt to heal a young girl believed to be ill or possessed.
Horror for Beginners
United States
1973
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Relative: 
Offspring
Psychics: 
Illusionist
Hypnotist
Medium
Telepathist
8
Better the devil you know!
7.04
7.04
8
7.04
3
4
4
Effects
Editing
Ambiance
The Exorcist is a battle between faith and the devil. It is implied, here, that God exists. The concept is reminiscent of vampire mythos, but is adapted to an urban tale of demonology. One of the singularities of the film is that is contains virtually no humor. It takes its horror very seriously, like few of its cousins. It is sad, terrifying, disgusting, and generally conveys negativity.
Once rid of its convoluted first act, the movie wastes no time getting to the hard stuff. It is heavy on symbolism and hard-felt dialogue, and uses the kind of filler that at least contributes to the suspense until the key scenes. In The Exorcist, Linda Blair plays a possessed child who swears, slaps her mother, masturbates with a crucifix, floats over her bed, and regurgitates on priests.
Judicious effects come into play to make this feel real. Some stunts are so violent they seem like they were not meant to be seen. The directing is impeccable. The pacing is effective in gradually dragging the audience in an increasingly troubling plot. It’s a gory, gooey and blasphemous masterpiece, and one of the best slow-burns of recent horror history.
Alternate Titles: 
William Peter Blatty's The Exorcist
Streaks of Terror 2019: My Favorite Horror Movie Franchises

Nightmare on Elm Street, Friday the 13th, Halloween, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Hellraiser, Child’s Play, Scream, Saw, Alien, Predator, Evil Dead – Film critic Steve Hutchison covers some of his favorite horror movie franchises, providing a synopsis, a review, and ranking all installments.

The Almanac of Terror 2019: 89 Years of Horror Movie Statistics

The following recommendation lists are based on 2000 horror movie reviews. They were extracted from a database and formatted for this book. Tales of Terror (www.terror.ca) is an online “gamified” tool designed for horror fans, students, authors and filmmakers. “Gamification” is the adaptation and transformation of tangible concepts into empirical games. Not unlike sport publications, fantasy leagues and role-playing games, the Almanac of Terror mixes and aggregates different statistics, facts, ratings and opinions. Most of the lists included in this book are sorted from best to worst according to their overall score. Some lists are sorted by pertinence. Our classification method uses genres, subgenres, ambiances and antagonists. Our different ratings are as follows: stars, story, creativity, action, quality, gimmick, and rewatchability. We sometimes use the “creepiness” factor when populating certain lists.

66 All-Japanese Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by Japan. How many have you seen?

Trends of Terror 2019: 101 Horror Movies for Beginners

Have you been recently introduced to horror movies? You want to explore the genre and don’t know where to start? Here are 101 simple and accessible ranked horror movies you should definitely check out. How many have you seen?

66 All-British Horror Movies

This book contains 66 reviews of horror films written and ranked by critic and blogger Steve Hutchison. Each description includes five ratings (stars, story, creativity, acting, quality), a synopsis and a review. All 66 movies were produced exclusively by the United Kingdom. How many have you seen?