Subgenres of Terror, 2nd Edition: Futuristic Films

Included in this book are 49 reviews of horror and horror-adjacent futuristic films.

Futuristic films are films with settings beyond the year they were released or made, even if that setting is now in the past, and films with a futuristic setting despite of unspecified date.

Each book in the second edition of the Subgenres of Terror collection contains a thematic watchlist in which movies are sorted in order of preference.

Mystery of the Wax Museum

Missing people and corpses lead a reporter to a wax museum owned by a strange sculptor.

 

United States
1933
Feature Film
Realism: 
Plausible
Character Focus: 
Professional Film
Trickster: 
Impostor
Catastrophes: 
Fire
4
Wax and wane...
4
4
6
4
1
3
2
Performances
Pace
Photography
This intricate picture was created in two-color Technicolor, in shades of salmon and peacock, and it is one of the last dramatic fiction films made with this process. It certainly has an appeal and it makes you wonder why this didn’t become a standard. The production looks twenty years younger than it is. The special effects are, too, ahead of their time.
The wax figures look like real people because, well, that’s what they are, in most cases. Some of them are beyond creepy. Some move and aren’t supposed to. All characters have their perks. There’s a drug addict, a deaf-mute; there’s even a monster. Sculptor, reporter, editor, model; people are defined by their occupations and everyone’s got a respectable job.
The performances are theatrical and not as stiff as you’d expect. The script is big on dialogue and slow, but not particularly slow for a 1933 movie. An interesting thing to note is that it was made before the application of the Hays Code. It’s basically free of censorship. Those are all reasons that should urge you to watch Mystery of the Wax Museum. It’s a great anomaly.
My Movie Reviews

Be your own film critic!

• Record the movies you see.
• Break them down and analyze them.
• Categorize them.
• Share your movie journal with friends.
• 200 pages, 6" x 9"

My Nightmare Diary

• Write about your nightmares in this dream diary. Write about places, people, and what scared you. Draw pictures of your nightmares.
• A great notebook to keep at your bedside to record your dreams and analyze them.
• 120 pages, 6" x 9"

Frankenstein Reviewed: 2020 Edition

Horror critic Steve Hutchison analyzes 39 Frankenstein movies. How many have you seen? Each article includes a synopsis, five different ratings, and a review.

Dracula Reviewed: 2020 Edition

Horror critic Steve Hutchison analyzes 34 Dracula movies. How many have you seen? Each article includes a synopsis, five different ratings, and a review.

Godzilla Reviewed: 2020 Edition

Horror critic Steve Hutchison analyzes the 36 first Godzilla movies. How many have you seen? Each article includes a synopsis, five different ratings, and a review.