Godzilla

The American military fights a mutated dinosaur while their scientists investigate its origins.
 
 
United States
Japan
1998
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Animals: 
Dinosaur
Imaginary
Stalker: 
Thief
Babies: 
Newborn
Government: 
Army
Politician
Trickster: 
Impostor
Catastrophes: 
Apocalypse
Biohazard
Collapse
Crash
Explosion
Fire
Storm
Giant: 
Kaiju
Behemoth
Infected: 
Irradiated
 
 
 
 
4
Godzilla for dummies...
 
6
3.04
6
8
1
4
1
Photography
Ambiance
Performances
Much like the sequels to Godzilla that were heavy on dialog but not as rigorous when it came to their logic, this American remake spoon-feeds you for a little over two hours content you may or may not care about. There have been attempts to break the language and cultural barriers between the Japanese and the Americans in the franchise, but this is the first fully assumed initiative.
The makers take ownership of the material. They strip away the comfort of the old aesthetic and innocence, getting rid of visual cheese, technical mistakes, yet delivering less than Jurassic Park, as a sad result. The famous monster’s 3-D mesh is never fully revealed. It does seem threatening, but it is not exactly the mutant we've come to love. Godzilla should be more than an irradiated dinosaur.
As a standalone film, it’s barely decent. It looks like every other Independence Day's of its era; mainstream, not cult, movies that are meant to bring people in theaters but that you never go back to. The film looks great, the actors fine, but there is no flavor to it all; no style, no surprise, no tact. Darkness and rain help hide a monster, but in this case it's too much. It's grey, depressing.
 
 
 
 
Alternate Titles: 
Godzilla 24
Godzilla 1998
Roland Emmerich's Godzilla