Rebirth of Mothra

A giant moth protects earth against a three-headed dragon and its summoner.
 
 
Japan
1996
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Kid Friendly
Translated
Animals: 
Dinosaur
Dog
Imaginary
Stalker: 
Sneaker
Trespasser
Relative: 
Sibling
Catastrophes: 
Collapse
Earthquake
Explosion
Fire
Giant: 
Kaiju
Behemoth
Object: 
Jewel
Psychics: 
Hypnotist
Telekinetic
Screenplay: 
Concept: 
Franchise Sequel
Franchise Spin-Off
 
 
 
 
4
A visual symphony
 
8
4
4
5.04
1
4
1
Pace
Performances
Effects
While the insect called Mothra belongs to the world of giant monsters, as depicted by the many earlier films it was featured in, the first act, here, instead features pocket-sized creatures fighting between themselves. That is, until the infamous King Ghidorah makes a surprise appearance, injecting a dose of aggressiveness and a hint of destruction for the rougher audience’s benefit.
The puppetry and costumes are splendid. Their superposition contrasts too much with the backdrops they are laid on and this is where the illusion is lost, though. The Cosmos, those famous “ethereal twins” from earlier kaiju films, are prominent and among the main protagonists. As it turns out, fortunately, they can now actually have a conversation and don’t sound as much like a broken record.
The Rebirth of Mothra is a fairy tale and, as such, it succeeds on most levels and surely at entertaining the fan. Yes, you’ll get to hear that catchy Mothra song again, remixed, mind you, beautifully redone and dense instrumentally. Singing and score take a special place, here. It is part of the summoning ritual and, consequently, gets the story where it needs to go in style.
 
 
 
 
Alternate Titles: 
Mosura