Pumpkinhead

An avenging demon is resurrected by a father whose son was accidently killed by tourists.
 
 
 
 
 
5.04
You’ll want one of these…
 
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Effects
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It's a supernatural revenge story with spine-chilling visuals. It introduces what deserves a spot in the pantheon of horror icons; a creature similar to 1979’s Alien's. The dry southern setting is populated with dust roads, sand dunes and a general store. The film has a strong graphic signature, a good premise, but shies away from the monster by means of filler, sometimes stretching time too much.
Lance Henriksen authentically plays Ed who, by summoning a demon, hopes to avenge his son. Anger and evil are protagonized, making Pumpkinhead an unlikely slasher film where the antagonist is weak and where an otherwise mysterious villain sides with the protagonist. The role reversal is also the main reason the movie isn't as scary as it could be, though the experimental approach seems deliberate.
Good and evil, religion and occult, heroism and fear, justice and crime; the spectra are ill-defined, here. While on the fringe of conventional monster design, the Pumpkinhead demon is raised by and answers to a single person at a time. It is written as some human-controlled organic puppet and as a vessel for hate. It is the tool of angry wizards and witches and a good excuse for a franchise.