Monster of Monsters: Ghidorah

A princess is possessed by an alien force that threatens to unleash a giant destructive creature.
Japan
1964
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Translated
Animals: 
Bird
Dinosaur
Imaginary
Insects: 
Imaginary
Larva
Stalker: 
Sneaker
Trespasser
Cultists: 
Guru
Worshipper
Catastrophes: 
Apocalypse
Biohazard
Collapse
Crash
Explosion
Fire
Volcano
Giant: 
Kaiju
Behemoth
Infected: 
Irradiated
Psychics: 
Hypnotist
Medium
Telepathist
4
Three heads are better than none...
8
3.04
6
5.04
1
4
1
Photography
Pace
Effects
Godzilla is a creature pertaining to both science-fiction and fantasy. This third sequel indulges in the latter. It's a sporadic musical, it's artsy, not so objective, but it's as revolutionary as the previous films have been. It cares more about its leads, but they are not the center of the story. They are meant to make this feel like a horror movie through their concerned perspective.
Like Godzilla vs. Mothra, this film benefits from good photography, a warmer script and more elegant performances. The makers finally managed to make the monsters visually decent. Godzilla never looked so good in desaturated color, considering the additional level of difficulty required to make the sets and costumes plausible while keeping things photographically pleasing.
There is an unaddressed elephant in the room. While we're making Godzilla a mystery, once more, by showing less of him, this also means we're wasting precious minutes on a distantly connected detective romance obviously used as padding. The story keeps you entertained and apprehending the inevitable, and we get the candy we came for, but in small bits, only, contrary to the previous films.
Alternate Titles: 
Godzilla 5
San daikaijû: Chikyû saidai no kessen
Ghidorah, the Three-Headed Monster
Earth's Greatest Battle