The Son of Kong

A man travels to an island where he finds the offspring of a giant ape he was once prey to.
 
 
United States
1933
Feature Film
Realism: 
Supernatural
Black & White
Animals: 
Dinosaur
Gorilla
Imaginary
Bear
Catastrophes: 
Accident
Collapse
Fire
Storm
Flood
Giant: 
Kaiju
Behemoth
Screenplay: 
Story: 
Uncredited: 
Franchise Sequel
 
 
 
 
3.04
The monster's getting too friendly...
 
7.04
3.04
5.04
3.04
1
4
1
Ambiance
Pace
Effects
Denham, the filmmaker partially responsible, at least morally, for the disaster in 1933’s King Kong returns to the island where he almost lost his life. He’s still played by Robert Armstrong and he carries the film on his shoulder with the help of a female lead depicted as strong, talented and ambitious. This gives flesh to our characters and their backstory pretty much writes itself.
Son of Kong’s biggest flaw is a fully conscious, budgetary one: for the first half, we get romance, wit, a performed song, endless dialog and a human antagonist important enough in the plot that he contributes to postponing monster action until our patience runs low. Fortunately, all this is constructed and filmed by people of talent and the filler is well lubed.
Eventually, we meet Kong‘s offspring and his violent friends. The stop-motion, although there is struggle in the technique, still manages to look creepy, somehow. The beasts are often superposed to miniature sets and color keyed with actors in the foreground. Those combined elements are high in movement and rendered contrast. It is sometimes hard on eye, but always fascinating to watch.
 
 
 
 
Alternate Titles: 
King Kong 2
King Kong Part 2
King Kong II
King Kong Part II